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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the government targets one of the strongest. understanding the often misunderstood, companies focusing on special talents of those living with gaspers syndrome. france is sending more military personnel, 550 troops on the ground and the flow is speeding up as the intervention intensifies. >> they will not allow them to fall, they wanted to be a quick operation. these transport carriers have been loaded with heavy and sophisticated equipment. they could not prevent the capture, and the government controls on garrison towns. the group that took the area says it is still willing to negotiate. >> we spoke to the mediator telling them we are willing to reach a peaceful solution. the government has nothing to do with what is going on right now. >> france is now on the ground as well as the air. some of the troops will remain, protecting them while others will have further north. one of the last lines of defense against the rebels and the north. >> we have a equipment's on the ground with artillery equipment and the means to fight in three dimensions. we are heavily equipped on territory. >> it is not c
government. hello. this is al jazeera live from doha. african military leaders are meeting to speed up the deployment of a new international force in mali. >> on the first humanitarian flights into rebel-held territory in the central african republic. i will be reporting on the desperate need for the people. >> and the last sighting of a missing activist. why the police have come under suspicion. a pakistan's supreme court has issued an arrest warrant for the prime minister. raja pervez ashraf is accused of corruption in deals to build new power plants when he was a water and power minister. the court has given 24 hours to arrest him along with 16 other people to. this decision comes as tens of thousands of protesters rallied against corruption of the leader.n >> we are here in front of the parliamentary house just to save our country from collapse and from complete ruin. we need substantial changes in our democratic, political, and electoral systems. we ought to put democracy in place. >> let's go to our correspondent in the pakistani capital. kamal, why is the supreme court issuing t
an unconfirmed number of people and were in a standoff with the algerian army. the governments of norway, france and japan say the citizens are among the captives. reuters news agency is reporting 25 foreign nationals escaped. it says two japanese citizens among them. algerian tv station says 40 algerians are also free. a news agency has also been reporting the militants said algerian army helicopters launched attacks. the militants had been threatening to kill the hostages if the army intensified its assault. they demanded france end the military campaign in neighboring mali. the french government has yet to issue an official response. the algerian government says it will not negotiate with the hostage takers. the british firm bp and other foreign companies operate the natural gas facility. >>> investigators looking into the emergency landing of a 787 dreamliner in japan have found evidence smoke did appear inside the aircraft. officials weren't immediately able to confirm that on wednesday after the boeing plane landed. the incident prompted japanese, american and european aviation authorities
, or anywhere else. >> in october, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton was in algeria urging the government to crack down on fighters who had taken control of large parts of of mali. attacks on oil and gas facilities are commonplace in other countries like nigeria where fighters are angry over foreign companies influence over production and want a bigger share the wealth. no similar reason has been given in this hostage crisis yet. >> as you heard, the algerian anterior ministry say, former commander for al qaeda in a migrant is responsible for this. he decided to form his own group. he is called the one-eyed. and he's been called un catchable, by the french. an expert says groups use al qaeda to strengthen their international profiles. >> al qaeda in the maghreb is a new phenomenon, especially in algeria. it stems back to the early 1990's when the islamic salvation islamicwon the majority of seats in the first round of the 1991 legislative election. the second round was cancelled with the expectation they would have won a majority. a splinter group needed outside support. that's when it an
's not the first time the algerian government has used military force to deal with extremists. nhk world gives us some perspective on the political situation. >> reporter: the algerian government hard line approach can be traced back to the decade-long civil war that ended in 2002. in 1991, islamic parties won a landslide victory in the country's first democratic election. but one year later, military forces carried out a coup on the grounds they were protecting the republican system. >> translator: algerian history has a precedent for terrorist tactics, leading to victory. in the case of the war of independence against france. so in a sense, there's a kind of justification for terrorism, and at the same time, there's the idea of never surrendering in the face of terrorism coming from the enemy. >> reporter: the civil war claimed the lives of 200,000 people. it involved indiscriminate bombings and widespread human rights violations. president abdelaziz bouteflika was elected for the first time in 1999. he was re-elected in 2004 and 2009. bouteflika chose to deal with militant groups in two ways.
on the rescue operation or the fate of the hostages. >>> it's not the first time the algerian government has used military force to deal with extremists. nhk world gives us some perspective on the political situation. >> reporter: the algerian government hard line approach can be traced back to the decade-long civil war that ended in 2002. in 1991, islamic parties won a landslide victory in the country's first democratic election. but one year later, military forces carried out a coup on the grounds they were protecting the republican system. >> translator: algerian history has a precedent for terrorist tactics, leading to victory. in the case of the war of independence against france. so in a sense, there's a kind of justification for terrorism, and at the same time, there's the idea of never surrendering in the face of terrorism coming from the enemy. >> reporter: the civil war claimed the lives of 200,000 people. it involved indiscriminate bombings and widespread human rights violations. president abdelaziz bouteflika was elected for the first time in 1999. he was re-elected in 2004 and 2
charges. >> this came after a mass protest in the capital added to pressure by the government. >> and aid to the government has accused the military of orchestrating the protests, and the order to arrest the prime minister. this political turmoil comes just months ahead of national elections. >> instead of millions, security officials say it is more like 25,000 protesters gathered in the parliaments in islamabad. there have been isolated clashes, and there was violence as demonstrators reached the heavily fortified area around the parliament building. gunshots were heard, but it was unclear if they were from protesters or police. he is so far unknown in pakistani politics and is demanding the government step down immediately and that a caretaker government be set up to ensure that elections may reflect a truly democratic result. >> this is absolutely laughlin and democratic. we are here in front of the parliamentary house, parliament house, just to say -- save our country from collapse. and he blames the government for incompetence and corruption, and as if on cue, the country's supreme c
the walls off buildings at the university of aleppo and set cars on fire. government and opposition forces have competing narratives of what happened. the state-run news agency blamed opposition fighters. it said what it called terrorists fired rockets, killing students and people taking shelter in the dormitories. and opposition activists said government forces were responsible. the activists quoted a student as saying that students were taking exams when planes attacked. opposition fighters have renewed their offensive in the area of northern syria around aleppo. government forces have responded with air strikes. >>> international nuclear inspectors are hoping to get back to a place they've wanted to return to for years. a team from the international atomic energy agency has left for iran. the inspectors want to get into a military site they believe may be used to develop nuclear weapons. the inspectors have made repeated requests to visit the facility southeast of tehran. they believe iranian scientists have tested explosives at the parchin military complex as part of an effort to produ
you get a load of what he said jon stewart. nothing but fun. and aaron swartz. the government went after him like a ton of bricks. he committed suicide. oh devastating. i talked to him earlier in an interview on the online show. >> now i guess my job is to make sure it trickles down to other people. i feel like i got a pretty lucky break. right now there are millions of people who have not been so fortunate. >> he was trying to help people. the government did not like that. that story makes me so mad. all right we're going to truck about that on tonight's show as well. it's go time. >> president obama had a press conference today. he wanted to talk about the debt ceiling and about the gun control a little bit. he has positive words that are encouraging for those of us who believe he should fight harder. let's listen. >> obama: i want to be clear about this. the debt cereal something not a question of authorizing more spending. raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay for spending that congress has already committed to. the issue
exactly? are they in rebel-held territory? >> diabaly is a town which is in the government-controlled area, in the north. the french are surrounding the town, from what we understand, with malian forces. there have been reports that there might of been some engagement on the ground, but we cannot confirm that. we have been trying to get through to people in diabaly, but the phone lines and mobile lines have been cut off, so it is very difficult to get information on the ground. it is interesting that the french had consistently said they would only be striking from them and giving logistical support, but now it seems they are carrying out their first land offensive. the french have 800 troops here on the ground. they have said they will double have said theye will double back to 2000 forces or 2500 altogether. ansar al din is one of the armed groups who have taken over the town of diabaly with sophisticated weapons. they had been fighting in libya on behalf of qaddafi, where they got the weapons, and also taken from the malians. they are able to take ground quickly. the french will have th
in that attack. opposition activists are blaming the government. >> the first day of school exams for many students at aleppo .niversity, and then guesthis what residents of syria's largest city described as to attacks on the campus. one was near campus accommodation where as many as 30,000 people live. many of them had moved there to escape violence and other areas of aleppo. some said the blast came from rocket attacks and planned opposition fighters. >> the cowardly terrorist act that targeted students at the university of aleppo. mr. president, we have always said that the terrorist armed groups in my country take advantage of the security council meeting at perpetrated terrorist acts in syria, and this is indeed what happened today. >> opposition groups say it was military, some say an aerial attack. some said it appeared to be for missiles launched from the ground. some neighborhoods have been destroyed while other groups say they control other parts of the city. this attack has left many casualties among students. people who are trying to improve their lives, despite destruction hap
jazeera live from our headquarters in doha. also ahead -- [chanting] >> celebration in islamabad. anti-government protests end after a deal is struck. a city paralyzed by water. the army and police are called in to help thousands surrounded by floods in jakarta. and confessions of a sporting superstar. lance armstrong's interview with oprah winfrey about to be broadcast. ♪ >> hello. one of the biggest international hostage crisis in decades appears to have come to an end 36 hours after it began. algerian security sources are reporting 30 hostages and 11 kidnappers were killed in a military operation at a gas plant in the east of the country. while the hostages included algerians as well as foreigners from at least nine countries including the u.s., britain and japan. algeria says those behind the attack include egyptians and others. they launch admit operation because the armed group threatened to blow up the gas installation. we report from washington. >> the algerian military decided to end the stage, the consequences of that action still not clear. in a day of confused messages, the hostage
. twin blasts rocked the school, killing at least 80 people. rebel forces as the government bombed the campus deliberately. from neighboring turkey, james reynolds reports. >> the university of aleppo was thought to be one of the last safe places in syria of's largest city. but two explosions changed that. these pictures were filmed just after the blasts. the side of this building was blown away. the university was home to both students and ordinary people who had taken refuge from fighting elsewhere in aleppo. the browns are in an area of grounds nt control -- brow are in an area under government control, but activists say it was the government to fired. >> this is the signal of the government. >> the government denies this. it says that the explosions were carried out by terrorists. it has been almost two years of fighting in syria. aleppo has been the scene of intense conflicts between the government and rebels. neither have been able to force the other to retreat for good. no corner of the city is safe. james reynolds, bbc news, is double. -- istanbul. >> lance armstrong has al
government falling, meaning a security force that's unable to secure the country. >> i think back to i re-read barbara tuckman's book. at one point a british leader asked a french leader how many troops they needed early in the war and the french leader said just one and i'll make sure he gets killed. the point he was making was commitment. i think it's less about how many american forces are there. it's actually even not important how many american dollars or technology is there. there's this intangible commitment, the idea that we are reliable. i like to describe it almost as a line of credit that a business has. they really don't want to draw on it, but having it knows that they can maintain the solvency of the business. the afghans are terrified right now. >> if we lose afghanistan, what do we really lose? people have made the point time and time again al qaeda as a threat is no longer in country, the taliban itself could be part of the government and as much as the united states may hate that, the united states forces were not there just to protect women and we'll leave even if women
. on the newshour tonight, we'll examine what the president said about tackling the government deficit and reducing gun violence. >> brown: then, we turn to the west african nation of mali, where french troops have launched air strikes on islamic militants. three jihaddist groups now deemed a clear and present danger to the capital and beyond, a threat to africa and europe. >> woodruff: margaret warner has the story of the suicide of a young internet wizard who was facing federal charges for hacking and distributing online data he thought should be made public. >> brown: ray suarez updates the changes in cuba, where travel restrictions were eased today for citizens hoping to come and go. >> it is still one of the most repressive places in terms of its human rights record but we welcome any liberalization. we hope that will turn out to be one such. >> woodruff: and with rehearsals already under way for next week's inaugural ceremonies, we examine the new rules for raising money for the festivities. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provi
avenue today over the national debt and government spending. the opening shots came from president obama at his white house news conference. >> i thought it might make sense to take some questions this week as my first term comes to an end. >> brown: the questions were dominated by the looming debt ceiling fight. the president sternly warned republicans not to balk at raising the nation's borrowing limit. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choose quickly because time is running short. >> brown: congress has until march to raise the debt ceiling and prevent a government default. most republicans have insisted that with the government facing another trillion dollar deficit this year, any increase in borrowing authority must be tied to cuts in spending. the president flatly disagreed. >> i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing m
to commit a gun crime. >> i am proud to be a new yorker today. i am proud to be part of this government. not just because new york has the first bill but because new york has the best bill. this is a complex multifaceted problem. this is a comprehensive bill that addresses the full panorama and spectrum of issues that come up. >> woodruff: other leaders, including new york city mayor michael bloomberg, have joined the call for action this week at a summit on gun violence in baltimore. >> the rate of firearms homicide in america is 20 times higher than it is in other economically advanced nations. we have got to change that. and it has to start this week. with real leadership from the white house. >> woodruff: maryland and delaware are also weighing new laws, as two new polls show national support for more gun control. the pew research center found a majority favors banning assault weapons and tracking gun sales. and a "washington post"/abc news survey out today found more than half of americans support a ban on assault weapons while nearly two-thirds would ban high capacity magazines. 5
are among the detainees. irish government confirms one of its citizens is also being held captive. a spokesperson for jgc corporation says the nationals worked for their operations in algeria. the company is building three natural gas plants there a representative at a local jgc office told nhk he received a phone call from an employee stationed at a site about 1,000 kilometers south of the capital, algiers. he said the employee told him that gunshots had been heard in the distance over a period of about 20 minutes. the representative then said he lost contact with the employee. algerian news agency dna has reported that an armed group attacked a boarding house for staff working at an oil-related facility about 1500 kilometers south of algiers. it says the militants are holding the captives on site and are warning they will blow up the facility if authorities try to step in. the agency also reports that a gun fight erupted with algerian forces and that there are reports of casualties. the algeria press service says two people died in the violence and six were injured, including tw
down government growth. we don't need to cut government. we simply need to slow it down. if we do that we'll eliminate the annual deficit. >> you hear the argument that is like throwing granny off a cliff. >> i don't think it is. i disagree with it. neil: do you feel attempted to go into politics? >> no. if i ever do i hope somebody talks me out of it. neil: some of the best ideas i ever heard, john are from guys like you. the whole process soils you, oh, my god, i can't deal with it, it is so stupid? >> it is difficult because i found in my own experience when you're very authentic and tell the truth and honest often times get attacked. you get smeared, you, very difficult. takes a lot of courage, i think to go into the political realm these days. neil: will be interesting. put it that way. john mackey. whole foods market cofounder, co-ceo. conscience capitalism. read it. thought to paper and thought that sticks in your head. all right. inauguration on monday. we are there. i'm there all day. we'll get there at 6:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m. liv says. ♪ lou: good evening, everybody. bre
, will they shut down the government. >> no, not over the debt ceiling. they may over the continuing resolution this is not their best vehicle. my guess is what they will probably have to do is give him a short-term extension. and then see if the senate will go along. they being of course the house republicans and just try to prolong this fight for a while. they don't want to have-- not shutting down the government is really spooking the credit markets and everything that major talked about a moment ago. and how the president would handle short-term extension is another matter. i think that would back him into a corner. he also ran into a problem because both in response to major and in response to julianna goldman he said i'm not going to negotiate over this. if they want to have a conversation, i'll be happy to have a conversation. i'm not quite clear sure how i distinguish between conversations and negotiations here. so i think this is only one of a number of pieces that are going to be played out in the next couple months. in many ways the continuing resolution and so-called sequester, the
.s. law pro ibt hads assisting a government or a military that came to power through a coup. and right now the malian government that we are trying to support in their efforts to control the rebels and to control the al qaeda and islamic militants in mali came to power through coup. so we can't provide them direct assistance. so u.s. law prohibits that. we're finding work arounds what that mean as secretary clinton laid out today is that by this weekend there will be military trainers in the area to train african militaries to go into mali, we'll be paying for that. we will be helping to fund the airlift to bring in a french battalion. there will be about 600 troops coming in with tanks to mali. so there are work arounds but there are restrictions that prevent the u.s. military from getting directly involved in mali. >> what can we do to support the french? >> the french have asked the united states for a number of things. the mallian government has also asked the united states for a number of things. right now the u.s. is agreeing to provide intelligence. we do have an unmanned drone that
: the problem with that statement is that this government has negotiated with terrorists. our government has been engaged in talks with the taliban and afghanistan since early 2009. the same group that has been a safe haven in the immediate aftermath of september 11th. documents found in the abbottabad compound the lion was killed proving a close working relationship between the two. the same group that is also responsible for a large portion of the 2200 american soldiers killed in afghanistan since 2001. not to mention the palestinian liberation organization the designation changed after we helped negotiate the deal. meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton chose her words carefully, while suggesting that the algerian government could use a hand in the battle in that region. >> it absolutely essential that we broaden and deepen our counter-terrorism cooperation going forward with algeria and all countries of the region. i make clear to the prime minister that we stand ready to further enhance the counter-terrorism support that we already provide. lou: the situation on the ground in al
the u.s. should be governed and should govern itself. i would almost characterize it as something along the lines of a response to what we heard from president reagan in 1981 when he said government is not the solution to our problems, it is the problem. president obama making the case that the government is not necessarily our problem. together we could do great things. together we could take care of the elderly. together we can create a health care system for those who may not be able to afford it. very much discussing ways about how there should be some in society you don't have all or should not be some in society you have all at the expense of all others. he made and not to climate change, something that he had not necessarily highlighted or focused on in his first demonstration. moving forward in tackling debt and deficits, he did talk about tax reform. talk about slowing the growth of these expenses, but still no change in his governing philosophy, if not impassioned defense of his governing philosophy. we have heard from democrats and republicans not throughout the day calling f
repairs on the national on the association's hand that governs the national mall so that is a virtual cross when we come to it but there's a number of civic minded things we will be able to do if we are lucky enough to have access funds when it said and done. >> whoever can address this how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in the security on the date of the inauguration and also how large an area will be closed off with street closures? >> for stila to apologize for saying it was morning when i was actually afternoon. but to answer your question we cannot go into detail as far as how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. can you repeat the second question for me? >> [inaudible] >> i can't go into detail unfortunately. >> -- area closed off. >> we have road closures and effectively to talk with you after words to provide you with those. >> [inaudible] >> with all events that happened on the capitol complex, we train constantly to address them. as far as specific threats, i can't answer that right now. but just know myself -- boug
-business customers and others who do not know what their tax rates are going to be or what areas the government may cut back on spending. it is a difficult position for people to wait in. even if they are seen profitability and growth in their business, they are trying to get by with what they haven't been rather than commit to -- with what a house rather than commit to new investments. >> you know how much of a world of participation rate is going to play in unemployment going forward? we have seen a sort of stabilization. will it hit the bottom? and have all of the we're factors played out and now it is just demographics? >> one dindane -- one thing that surprised everybody and one of the reasons we have had a lot of progress on the unemployment rate is past years we have not seen a lot of people re-enter the labour force. participation rates have been pretty much trending down. there is some stabilization that we are seeing now and some are speculating that we might see a little more reentry, but there are varying opinions on that. some on the committee are expecting a lot of people to re- enter
on the national mall through the association that governance the national mall. that's a bridge we'll cross when we come to it. but there are a number of civic-minded things to do if we are lucky to have access funds when it is all said and done. >> cnn. how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in the security on the day of the inauguration? and also, how large of an area will be closed off with street closures? >> first, to answer your question, we cannot go into detail as to how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. and could you repeat your second question for me? >> how many agencies? >> i can't go into detail. >> how much will be closed off. >> we have road closures in effect and i can provide you with information on those. >> [inaudible question] veragets with all events that happen on the capitol complex, we train constantly to address them. as far as specific threats, i can't answer that right now, but just know that united states capitol police with our law enforcement partners have trained constantly in regards to issues that may com
been killed in u.s. drone strike inside yemen. yemeni government says the attack of four militants but the claim has not been independently verified. the attack comes one day after those of anger of the drone attacks blocked a main road linking the targeted town with the capital. the obama administration meanwhile reportedly has decided to exclude cia drone strikes in pakist from new legal oversight for targeted killings overseas. the washington post reports counter-terrorism adviser and cia-nominee john brennan has signed off on a plan to exempt the drone attacks in pakistan from a list of operations that would be covered under newly enacted rules. areas covered in the so-called play book include the process for adding names to kill lists, the principles for killing u.s. citizens abroad, and the command chain for authorizing cia or u.s. military strikes outside war zones. the exemption of drone strikes in pakistan would allow the cia to continue carrying them without -- tearing them without a legal framework for a to two years. the hostage standoff in a jury of his ended in the de
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)